EUroFire Cloth

Clothing and Fashion for You

Tag: PVC

Through The Decades – 1960s Vintage Clothing

The 1960’s was a decade that broke barriers in terms of fashion, especially for women.

When purchasing vintage clothes, you are automatically buying into a piece of fashion history, but when buying vintage clothes from the swinging sixties, you really are buying a piece of history that moulded the fashion industry from then in.

The sixties is a decade of fashion that had so many trends that began in the era, that when buying vintage there is so much choice it’s hard to pick.

In the beginning of the decade Jackie Kennedy was still wearing the famous skirt and trouser suits and pillbox hats, a trend that withstood nearly 7 years of season changes, so style was somewhat conservative. However all that changed when Mary Quant, a Welsh designer and British fashion icon developed the mini skirt and encouraged women to hike up their hemlines. The majority of miniskirts or mini dresses had geometric patterns, some often with bell sleeves and/or polo necks.

The ‘space’ look was also an integral part of fashion culture and believe it or not, people donned goggles paired with go go boots and clothes made from PVC or sequins. All these looks were paired with big hair, false eyelashes and pale lipstick.

As the era moved on so did the culture and the fashion, with the hippy trend becoming huge psychedelic patterns were everywhere. Bandanas were paired with bell bottom jeans and paisley prints and the emphasis on having hair as high as the sky wasn’t as important as in previous years.

However, probably one of the most significant trends to ever emerge into fashion, mainly for men, was the mod style. The importance of this new way of dressing is integral to fashion today and is probably one of the main reason why 1960’s vintage fashion is so sought after in today’s day and age, given the fact that men like Paul Weller still make it ‘cool’ to embody the style.

The mod style personified British fashion of the era and very much moulded a new lifestyle as well as dress code. Consisting of tight trousers, anoraks, shirts and ties, the key to pulling it off was combining a smart, gentlemanly look with a small amount of grunge to give an edge. The look was ultimately unisex and the women wore similar clothes and had short cropped hair.

This style has become something of a timeless classic, which in turn creates a need for vintage originals. The whole scene reeks of the cool element that vintage brings and having a fundamental part of the first release of these fashions seems to be part of the process if you want to be a fully fledged mod.

Vintage fashion from the sixties is not for the faint hearted, and wearers have to be brave enough to make a statement with their clothes. When choosing a trend to bring back to life from the sixties it is important to pick the right one, the styles are so iconic that it can sometimes look like fancy dress, the key thing with 1960s vintage clothes is to blend it so it looks kitsch, not clich.

Workwear Clothing For Different Professions

We are what we wear. Therefore, a lot of professions require for their employees to wear clothes that make them distinctly recognizable. Workwear clothing has therefore got a great demand from various organizations and companies. These attires are generally in the appearance of sleeved or sleeveless jackets worn over one’s regular clothes. The primary feature of these Hi Viz jackets is that they are made in a great variety of colors such as the fluorescent colors like lime, orange, blue, yellow, and red so that the wearer can sport them comfortably in both bright and dark areas. Most Hi Vis jackets have perpendicular and parallel reflective stripes in the front and hind which reflect the falling light from them thereby letting the wearer be more perceptible, especially in the nocturnal environment. The goal of making these kinds of Workwear clothing is to ensure the safety of that wearer by reducing the probability of mishaps.

At times when a disaster strikes and the disaster management team reaches the scene, this Workwear clothing helps the victims to locate them easily in the mob. However, many bikers, bicycle riders as well as pedestrians also use such jackets for their personal safety. It is more essential for people in hazardous professions like the police, firefighters, paramedics, runway personnel and construction site workers to wear a Hi Vis jacket. Such jackets help them to be clearly visible in the night when the cars’ lights reflect upon them.

These types of protective Workwear clothing adheres to specific safety standards. It is generally made with polyester and PVC to make it water-resistant. The jackets that are specifically designed for the firefighters are made up of fire proof material. At the time of buying the jacket, one should consider the system used in the fastening of the jacket. Velcro fastening is much better a choice than the zips and buttons. A Velcro fastening system works faster in emergency situations like when the jacket gets caught up in a vehicle that is in motion and has to be pulled off urgently.

There are different varieties of Hi Vis clothing available online. The logos of the companies and government services can be designed on the jacket in fluorescent colors, which make it mandatory for their employees to use Hi Vis clothing. This helps both the one who wears them as also the people who are in need of his services.

These jackets are manufactured and designed in particular colors for people of different professions like blue for police personnel, green for paramedics and red for fire fighters. The Workwear clothing can be bought in regular stores or can be ordered online. It is advisable to conduct a research into the different types of varieties available before zeroing upon an appropriate one. There are different requirements of different companies, for instance, it may want to order for a specific type of Hi Viz Jacket in bulk for homogeneity among its staff which also cuts down the cost of the jackets.

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